November 1, 2007 09:50 Age: 6 yrs

CSLR Silver Anniversary Conference News

The Center for the Study of Law and Religion (CSLR) hosted “From Silver to Gold: The Next 25 Years of Law and Religion,” October 24-26 at Emory Law to celebrate its 25th anniversary. The conference brought together leading scholars to discuss the hardest questions in law and religion facing the world in the next quarter century. These topics were addressed in a series of keynotes, lectures and panel discussions.

The following are several articles that summarize the events of the conference:

James T. Laney Opening Keynote Address
With a decisive call for universities to be places of not only instruction but inspiration, preparing students for a life of purpose beyond self-profit, Emory President Emeritus James T. Laney opened the Center for the Study of Law and Religion’s 25th anniversary conference with a heartfelt keynote speech on Oct. 24 at the Emory Conference Center. Read the article in its entirety.

The Future of Law and Religion
During the next 25 years and beyond, people of the world must emphasize the spiritual values they hold in common if they hope to build a peaceful world community, according to Harold J. Berman, the lead-off speaker for the first session of the Center for the Study of Law and Religion’s silver anniversary conference Oct. 25. Read the article in its entirety.

The Future of Religious Liberty
What will the world of religious liberty look like in 2032? Legal scholar Douglas Laycock isn’t sure, but he has some guesses. Certain religious liberty issues in the U.S. have shown “remarkable persistence” and will probably still be somewhat contentious 25 years from now, Laycock said at the Center for the Study of Law and Religion’s 25th anniversary conference. Read the article in its entirety.

The Currie Lectures in Law and Religion
When human law aims to see into human hearts, says social and political ethicist Jean Bethke Elshtain, it is deeply problematic at best, tyrannical at worst. "We are often loathe to take up the possibility that the law, or, perhaps better put, an excess of legalities, may not so much protect us against tyranny as itself constitute an overbearing structure,” said Elshtain, Laura Spelman Rockefeller Professor of Social and Political Ethics at the University of Chicago, who was one of the two speakers to deliver the Currie Lectures in Law and Religion on Oct. 25. Read the article in its entirety.

The Future of Law, Religion, and Marriage
Scholars reflected upon the relationship between parent and child religious rights, the role of Christian jurisprudence in legal language, and the absence of the language of morality in legal terminology during the “The Future of Law, Religion, and Marriage,” Oct. 25 at the silver anniversary conference of Emory University’s Center for the Study of Law and Religion. Read the article in its entirety.

The Future of the African American Family
The lie of black inferiority must be eliminated to create a “renaissance” for African American families, said Enola G. Aird at the silver anniversary conference of Center for the Study of Law and Religion Oct. 25. "How to extinguish, once and for all, the lie of black inferiority that continues to undermine the ability of black people to love themselves and to love each other” is the hardest question that will have to be faced in the future, said Aird, a former corporate lawyer who founded and directs the Motherhood Project at the Institute for American Values. Read the article in its entirety.

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